A LOOK BEHIND THE SCENES OF BROADWAY NATIONAL TOURS

A LOOK BEHIND THE SCENES

OF BROADWAY NATIONAL TOURS


By Elysa Gardner | 

 

 

The theater community is facing an unprecedented obstacle this year in the form of COVID-19, the virus that shuttered Broadway last March and has proven equally devastating for the touring industry. “Theater is this 100-mile-per-hour train,” says Jeff Loeb, general manager of Los Angeles’s Hollywood Pantages Theatre and Broadway in Hollywood. “And it’s as if a brick wall has been placed in front of it.”

When the touring industry brings a Broadway series to your city, it is usually to a venue that stages touring shows in the building that it owns and/or manages. Historically referred to as bus-and-truck shows, these productions find the various players involved — the cast, crew, musicians, and management — traveling from city to city by bus and plane, while semi-trucks carry everything else necessary to physically put on a show (sets, costumes, lights, props, and sound equipment).

“It’s hard to believe, but most touring shows will arrive in a city in the wee hours on a Monday to ‘load-in,’ and by Tuesday afternoon, the cast and crew are rehearsing and preparing to go on for an audience at 8 p.m. that evening,” says Loeb. “If you’ve ever attended a ‘load-in’ event at your theatre, you’ve witnessed firsthand this remarkable feat.”

 


 

To read the entire Broadway Direct article:

 

https://broadwaydirect.com/a-look-behind-the-scenes-of-broadway-national-tours