What’s needed for Hollywood to get back to work safely?

What's needed for Hollywood to get back to work safely?

 

Director Dennie Gordon at home in Los Angeles.  Like many others in the entertainment industry, Gordon is following the safer-at-home directive in response to the coronavirus. (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)

 

By Stacy Perman
Staff Writer
27 March 2020

 

Entertainment is a high-touch business. Production crews consist of hundreds of individuals crowding together in enclosed spaces. Actors interact with each other in even closer proximity, as do hair and markup artists. Craft services are a communal activity, while writers huddle around a table in a small room.  And grips and set designers pass equipment and props back and forth.

It's the kind of entertainment where if one person falls ill, their sickness passes through the entire cast and crew like a wildfire.  Film and TV work is a hyper matrix of touch, sharing and interaction.

The ongoing public health crisis has shut down Hollywood in an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus. Yet a vaccine is at least a year away. The number of cases is rising and much of the country remains under quarantine. While the Trump administration wants the country opened up by Easter despite heal experts' warnings, Hollywood has many concerns about going back to work under these circumstances.

As the industry adjusts to working under quarantine, many have quietly considered what this will mean when the shelter-at-home orders are lifted and film crews and cast go back to work.

This week Gloria Calderόne Kellett, the co-showrunner of the Sony Pictures Television series "One Day at a Time" made those private concerns public when she tweeted:

 


 

To read the entire article from the Los Angeles Times dated 27 March 2020:

 

https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/business/story/2020-03-27/hollywood-coronavirus-returning-to-work-set-safety

 

 

By Stacy Perman
Staff Writer
27 March 2020